Biochar – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

biochar in detail thanks to Biochar Project


Biochar

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Left – a nutrient-poor oxisol; right – an oxisol transformed into fertile terra preta using biochar.

Biochar is charcoal created by pyrolysis of biomass, and differs from charcoal only in the sense that its primary use is not for fuel, but for biosequestration or atmospheric carbon capture and storage.[1] Charcoal is a stable solid rich in carbon content, and thus, can be used to lock carbon in the soil. Biochar is of increasing interest because of concerns about climate change caused by emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) and other greenhouse gases (GHG). Carbon dioxide capture also ties up large amounts of oxygen and requires energy for injection (as via carbon capture and storage), whereas the biochar process breaks into the carbon dioxide cycle[clarification needed], thus releasing oxygen as did coal formation hundreds of millions of years ago.[citation needed]

via Biochar – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

Adam retort kiln thanks to Biochar Project

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